American Politics

You Won’t Want Medicare For All Once You Know What It Actually Is #Genocide #healthcare #MedicareForAll #Communism

This week, Democrat-Communist & congressional mattress tester, Sen. Kamala Harris, who is comically one of the front-runners in the race for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, revealed her radical Marxist vision for American health care – outlawing private health insurance and putting the government in charge of the system.

Harris, along with 15 of her Democrat-Communist colleagues, supports Marxist Sen. Bernie Sanders’, I-Vt., vision of “Medicare-for-all.” Sanders’ 2017 bill, S.1804, was explicit about outlawing private health insurance.

At a town hall in Iowa last Monday, Harris confirmed she was on board with that idea. “Let’s eliminate all of that,” she said.

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In other words, Harris is running for president on a Communist platform of taking away the private insurance coverage of about 200 million people, and dumping everyone into a one-size-fits-all government-run health plan that would cost taxpayers trillions of dollars. And if the experiences of other countries with single-payer health care are any indication, it would result in long waits for poor care.

Support for Soviet-styled single-payer where the government controls who lives or who dies, appears to be the price of admission to the Democratic presidential race.

Even Obamacare forbade elderly patients from receiving cancer treatments, and even things so basic as a physical. In short, the government extermination of the “useless elderly”.

Harris’s fellow Marxists vying for the nation’s top job, Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., and Cory Booker, D.-N.J., were among the co-sponsors of Sanders’ 2017 “Medicare-for-all” legislation. And it’s only a matter of time before Sanders himself, the withered, Communist pied piper of the “Medicare-for-all” movement, joins the race.

“Medicare-for-all’s” advocates promise a health care system that’s free at the point of service – no co-pays, no deductibles, no coinsurance, but at the cost of bankrupting the nation and providing 3rd world level health care.

They tend to be less upfront about how they’d pay for it, because they have no idea. Literally all talk, no plan.

Independent estimates from both the right and the left peg “Medicare-for-all’s” cost at about $32 trillion over 10 years. Doubling what the federal government takes in individual and corporate income tax revenue wouldn’t be enough to cover that tab.

That’s assuming “Medicare-for-all” is able to implement its financing strategy. The bill proposes reimbursing doctors and hospitals at Medicare’s current rates, which are 40 percent below what private insurance pays.

Health care providers are unlikely to just absorb those cuts.

Those with narrow margins – especially in rural areas – may be forced to close, unable to cover their costs. Many doctors are expected to respond to lower payments by seeing fewer patients, retiring early, or leaving the practice of medicine altogether.

Potentially millions of America’s brightest young people may decide not to pursue careers in medicine, given that “Medicare for all” will limit their earning power to that of a low-level government bureaucrat.

Regardless, ratcheting down the price of care by force is going to cause health care providers to supply less of it. And that will lead to longer waits for patients and substandard, possibly fatal treatments, and denial of care even to the point of death, for those with expensive, but curable illnesses.

Incredibly long waits plague patients in other countries with government-run health care.

Take Canada, which outlaws private health insurance for anything considered medically necessary, just as “Medicare for all” would. The median wait for treatment from a specialist following referral by a general practitioner is 19.8 weeks, according to the Fraser Institute, a Vancouver-based think tank. In 1993, the median wait was less than half as much – 9.3 weeks.

Waits are far longer for some specialties. For orthopedic surgery, the median wait for specialist treatment is 39 weeks.

Many Canadians are uninterested in waiting multiple months for treatment, particularly if they’re in pain or fear they may have a serious illness. So they pay out of pocket for care abroad. In 2016, more than 63,000 Canadians went to another country to receive medical treatment.

On the other side of the Atlantic, the United Kingdom’s government-run, 70-year old National Health Service, is proving similarly incapable of providing quality care. The system is currently short 100,000 health professionals – doctors, nurses and other workers.

It’s no wonder 14 percent of operations are canceled right before they are supposed to happen, usually due to a shortage of staff or beds. Last July, 4.3 million patients were waiting for an operation – the highest figure in a decade.

During the winter, the system goes into crisis mode. Between December 2017 and February 2018, more than 163,000 patients waited in corridors and ambulances for over 30 minutes before being admitted to the emergency room. To deal with the crunch, officials ordered hospitals to cancel 50,000 operations.

American patients will not stand for the higher taxes and lower-quality care that “Medicare-for-all” would bring. A majority of people, 55 percent, erroneously believe that they’d be able to keep their private insurance under such a system. Once they learn it would eliminate private health insurance, support for the idea plummets, from 56 percent to 37 percent. The same happens after they learn it would require higher taxes.

Seven in 10 Americans say they’d oppose “Medicare-for-all” if it led to delays in getting some treatments and tests. Such delays are not hypothetical – they’re endemic to single-payer.

Harris and her fellow Democrats may think “Medicare-for-all” is their ticket to the White House. But voters are not interested in their plan to eliminate private health insurance.

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James E Windsor, Overpasses News Desk

 

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