American Politics

“Disclosing Grand Jury Material is a Violation of the Law” Trey Gowdy Slams Mueller Over Leak *VIDEO* #o4a #Trump

Mr Americana, Overpasses News Desk
October 29th, 2017

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GOP Rep. Trey Gowdy slammed special counsel Robert Mueller for allowing the news media to learn that he and his legal team now have charges in their Russia investigation.

“In the only conversation I’ve had with Robert Mueller, I stressed to him the importance of cutting out the leaks,” Gowdy, chairman of the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, ”told “Fox News Sunday. “It’s kind of ironic that the people charged with investigating the law and the violations of the law would violate the law.”

Mueller has been leading a witch hunt for 5 months in an attempt to find any evidence whether anybody associated with the President Trump’s 2016 White House campaign colluded with Russia to influence the election outcome.

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“Make no mistake, disclosing grand jury material is a violation of the law. Somebody violated their oath of secrecy,” Gowdy, a South Carolina lawmaker and former federal prosecutor, also told Fox News on Sunday.

The Wall Street Journal reported Saturday that anyone charged will be taken into custody Monday. However, the charges have been sealed by a federal judge. So whoever is charged and whether the charges are criminal remains unclear.

The charges come as Mueller’s tactics and involvement in the Uranium One deal that sold 20% of America’s uranium reserves to Russia, have been called into question.

During a raid by the FBI in July of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort’s Virginia home, a source close to the investigation told Fox News at the time the scope of the search was “heavy-handed, designed to intimidate.”

Andrew Weissmann, the prosecutor tapped by Mueller to help lead the investigation, has also received criticism. Sidney Powell, a former federal prosecutor recently wrote about Weissman in a piece titled, “Judging by Mueller’s staffing choices, he may not be very interested in justice.”

Powell accused Weissmann, once the director of the Enron Task Force, of “prosecutorial overreach” in past cases and said it could signal what’s to come for President Trump and his associates in the Russia probe.

“What was supposed to have been a search for Russia’s cyberspace intrusions into our electoral politics has morphed into a malevolent mission targeting friends, family and colleagues of the president,” Powell wrote in The Hill. “The Mueller investigation has become an all-out assault to find crimes to pin on them — and it won’t matter if there are no crimes to be found. This team can make some.”

Powell cited several cases where Weissmann won convictions that were later overturned.

During a Saturday appearance on Fox News, former Department of Justice official Robert Driscoll told anchor Leland Vittert it’s possible the indictment might not even be directly tied to Russian collusion.

“Think back to the Clinton years,” Driscoll said. “The Whitewater investigation was about an Arkansas land deal. And it ended up being about something else completely.”

Driscoll added, “Robert Mueller is free to look at taxes, is free to look at lobbying filings, foreign agent filings. Things like that could all be involved that wouldn’t necessarily touch on the issue of Russia collusion that everyone seems focused on politically.”

The Justice Department’s special counsel’s office declined to comment on the reports of filed charges.

Trump has denied allegations that his campaign colluded with Russians and condemned investigations into the matter as “a witch hunt”.

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