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Crews Clean Up 400 Tons of Human Waste, Needles & More From California Homeless Camp #California #homeless

Orange County Public Works released eye-popping figures Thursday, March 8, on the total amount of debris, needles and hazardous waste removed when crews cleaned up the area along the Santa Ana River Trail once populated by the encampments of homeless people.

Crews from the Orange County Conservation Corps work to clean trash left behind by homeless people on the Santa Ana River Trail in Anaheim on Monday, Feb 26, 2018. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

Here’s what was collected between Jan. 22 and March 3 from a more than two-mile stretch of bike trail roughly from I-5 in Orange to Ball Road in Anaheim, according to OC Public Works spokesman Shannon Widor:

404 tons of debris
13,950 needles (approximate number based on what disposal containers hold)
5,279 pounds of hazardous waste (human waste, propane, pesticides and other materials)

Some of the nearly 14,000 used needles collected by public works crews doing cleanup in the area along the Santa Ana River Trail once populated by homeless tent encampments. (Photo courtesy of OC Public Works)

Before and after photographs published by the Register last week show stark differences at different spots along the trail, as does a video the county posted.

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More than 700 people were living in the encampments when they were dismantled in late February. Most of those people are being housed temporarily in local motels while county outreach workers assess their need for services and housing.

The bike trail cleanup is the beginning of an environmental remediation effort that was expected to include the removal of 2 to 3 inches of soil in the project area and tree trimming. Planned improvements on the bike trail from Katella to Ball Road/Taft Avenue also could include sealing cracks and applying a slurry seal, Widor said.

Last month, we reported how California is ignoring their citizens in favor of illegal aliens, Los Angeles County’s homeless population is increasing faster than the supply of new housing, even with the addition of thousands of beds in the last two years and millions of dollars beginning to flow in from two ballot measures targeting the crisis, according to a long-awaited report by the region’s homelessness agency.

The report showed that officials two years ago far underestimated how much new housing would be needed when they asked city and county voters to approve the tax measures.

As a result, a $73-million annual shortfall in funding for the county’s comprehensive homelessness program could more than triple, a Times analysis of the report found.

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Meanwhile in San Francisco, the homeless rule the streets with feces, needles and urine becoming the trademark of of the Marxist-ruled city.

Citizens are feds up and speaking out about it too. “We see poop, we see pee, we see needles, and we see trash,” said teacher Adelita Orellana. “Sometimes they ask what is it, and that’s a conversation that’s a little difficult to have with a 2-year old, but we just let them know that those things are full of germs, that they are dangerous, and they should never be touched.”

In light of the dangerous conditions, part of Orellana’s responsibilities now include teaching young children how to avoid the contamination.

An Investigate Unit spent three days assessing conditions on the streets of downtown San Francisco and discovered trash on each of the 153 blocks surveyed. While some streets were littered with items as small as a candy wrapper, the vast majority of trash found included large heaps of garbage, food, and discarded junk.

The investigation also found 100 drug needles and more than 300 piles of feces throughout downtown.

Based on the findings of the Investigative Unit survey, Riley believes parts of the city may be even dirtier than slums in some developing countries.

“The contamination is … much greater than communities in Brazil or Kenya or India,” he said. He notes that in those countries, slum dwellings are often long-term homes for families and so there is an attempt to make the surroundings more livable. Homeless communities in San Francisco, however, are often kicked out from one part of town and forced to relocate to another.

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Mr Americana, Overpasses News Desk
March 11th, 2018

 

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