National News

Antitrust Probe Against Google Launched by Missouri Attorney General #o4anews #Google #Missouri

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someone

Mr Americana, Overpasses News Desk
November 14th, 2017

Missouri’s attorney-general did something that’s been overdue for years.

Google was not at all shy about publicly stating it would discriminate against conservative websites in 2014, hiding those websites from their search engine results. It was literally a case of comply or die for many websites.

So, the attorney-general of Missouri announced a wide-ranging antitrust investigation into Google.

Financial Times reports Missouri’s AG, Josh Hawley, said his office had issued a subpoena stemming from an investigation into the company’s business practices. The case is focused on the data that Google collects about its users, and whether it complies with the state’s laws in collecting, using and disclosing the information.

The Missouri investigation could once and for all prove that Google misappropriates content from other websites and manipulates its search results to favor its own services and blatantly discriminates against non-globalist, non-communist websites.

The case comes in the wake of a €2.42bn fine from the European Commission earlier this year over a complaint that Google unfairly promotes its own shopping search results. But Google has been free of antitrust pressure in its home market since 2013, when the Federal Trade Commission dropped an investigation into whether it manipulated search results.

In a statement, Mr Hawley said: “There is strong reason to believe that Google has not been acting with the best interest of Missourians in mind.”

Google has faced concerted regulatory action from state attorneys-general before, though not over competition questions.

Several states challenged the company over claims its advertising system was used to promote illegal and counterfeit drugs, and the company paid a fine to a number of states after it admitted to using its Streetview service to illicitly collect wifi data from homes it passed.

Google said it had not yet received the subpoena, but added: “We have strong privacy protections in place for our users and continue to operate in a highly competitive and dynamic environment.”

Tell us what you think in comments below!
For other important news,CLICK HERE

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Print this pageEmail this to someone