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Report – As You Read This, At Least 40 Million People on Earth Live in Slavery *VIDEO* #slavery #evil

North Korea and Eritrea have the world’s highest rates of enslaved people.

And, while slavery is far more prevalent in the developing world, powerhouse economies in the developed world have surprisingly high rates of forced labour, according to the 2018 Global Slavery Index, published by the human rights group Walk Free Foundation.

The global survey focuses on the roles of conflict and government repression in modern slavery.

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In addition to North Korea and Eritrea, the central African nation of Burundi also has a high prevalence of slavery.

“Each of these three countries has state-sponsored forced labour, where their government puts its own people to work for its own benefit,” said Fiona David, research chair of the Minderoo Foundation, which led the data collection.

More than 40-million people were enslaved around the world in 2016, according to an estimate by the Walk Free Foundation and the International Labour Organisation (ILO).

North Korea and Eritrea have the world’s highest rates of enslaved people.

And, while slavery is far more prevalent in the developing world, powerhouse economies in the developed world have surprisingly high rates of forced labour, according to the 2018 Global Slavery Index, published by the human rights group Walk Free Foundation.

The global survey, released on Thursday, focuses on the roles of conflict and government repression in modern slavery.

In addition to North Korea and Eritrea, the central African nation of Burundi also has a high prevalence of slavery.

“Each of these three countries has state-sponsored forced labour, where their government puts its own people to work for its own benefit,” said Fiona David, research chair of the Minderoo Foundation, which led the data collection.

More than 40-million people were enslaved around the world in 2016, according to an estimate by the Walk Free Foundation and the International Labour Organisation (ILO).

The Eritrean government is “a repressive regime that abuses its conscription system to hold its citizens in forced labour for decades”, the report says.

Burundi’s government also imposes forced labour, according to the report, while groups including Human Rights Watch have implicated its security forces in murders and disappearances.

Other countries with the highest rates of modern slavery were the Central African Republic, Afghanistan, South Sudan and Pakistan.

“Most of these countries are marked by conflict, with breakdowns in rule of law, displacement and a lack of physical security,” the report says.

With more than 9-million people living in slavery — nearly eight in every 1,000 people — Africa has the highest rate of enslavement of any region, according to the report.

The researchers also warned that consumers in affluent countries may be buying products manufactured using slave labour.

Laptops, computers and cellphones are the largest category, by value, of at-risk imports, at $200bn, followed by clothing, at $128bn, fish at $13bn, cocoa at $4bn, and sugar cane at $2bn.

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“Global slavery is embedded in our global economy,” Grace Forrest, co-founder of Australia-based Walk Free, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

The US is by far the largest importer of at-risk products ($144bn). Japan is the second-largest G20 importer of at-risk products, at $47bn, followed by Germany ($30bn), the UK ($18bn) and France ($16bn).

Slavery is probably even more widespread than the research suggests.

The report noted gaps in data from Arab states, as well as a lack of information on organ trafficking and the recruitment of children by armed groups.

And in the developed world, it found that 403,000 people are living in modern slavery in the US, or one in every 800 Americans — seven times higher than previous estimates.

The prevalence of modern slavery in the UK is almost 12 times higher than previous figures.

The appetite for electric cars is driving a boom in small-scale cobalt production in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where some mines have been found to be dangerous and employ child labor/slaves.

Production from so-called artisanal mines probably rose by at least half last year, according to the estimates of officials at three of the biggest international suppliers of the metal, who asked not to be named because they’re not authorized to speak on the matter. State-owned miner Gecamines estimates artisanal output accounted for as much as a quarter of the country’s total production in 2017.

That’s a concern for carmakers from Volkswagen AG to Tesla Inc., who are seeking to secure long-term supplies of the battery ingredient but don’t want to be enmeshed in a scandal about unethical mining practices.

Tech giants including Apple Inc. and Microsoft Corp. endured bad publicity after a 2016 Amnesty International report said children were being sent down some Congolese mines to dig for cobalt destined for their gadgets. Pit and tunnel collapses killed dozens of workers in 2015, the advocacy group said.

Cobalt has tripled in value in the last 18 months as the rise of electric vehicles intensifies competition for scarce resources. Two-thirds of the world’s supply comes from Congo, the second-poorest nation. The boom in the metal, currently trading above $80,000 a metric ton, has triggered more mining in the cobalt-rich Katanga region, where sprawling hand-dug mines dot the landscape, and searching for ore is as commonplace as farming.

Meanwhile, Barbary Coast Muslims are making a killing auctioning off enslaved Africans.

Footage released by CNN shows men being sold at an auction in Libya.

The footage shows an auctioneer standing in front of a group of young men, shouting: “Big strong boys for farm work. 400? 700? 800?”

CNN traveled to Libya to verify the authenticity of the footage. There, they secretly filmed an auction outside the Libyan capital of Tripoli.

Referred to as “merchandise,” the men being sold into slavery were migrants and refugees. Twelve Nigerian men were sold at the auction.

“Does anybody need a digger? This is a digger, a big strong man, he’ll dig,” one salesman said.

“Within minutes it is all over and the men, utterly resigned to their fate, are being handed over to their new ‘masters,’” CNN reported.

CNN was informed of the location of nine auctions. However, “there are believed to be many more.”

In a statement, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) recently recounted the story of an unnamed Senegalese migrant sold into slavery.

According to the IOM, the migrant “described being ‘bought’ and then being brought to his first ‘prison,’ a private home where more than 100 migrants were held as hostages.”

“He described dreadful sanitary conditions, and food offered only once per day. Some migrants who couldn’t pay were reportedly killed, or left to starve to death.”

A crackdown on people smuggling by the Libyan coast guard has led to an oversupply of refugee passengers expecting to be smuggled, by boat, into Europe.

The European Union’s decision to tighten its borders has also contributed to a backlog of migrants and refugees in Libya.

Those stranded in Libya are forced into slavery by people smugglers. According to the UN, there are approximately 700,000 migrants in Libya.

Migrants who become slaves and are rescued are generally forced to return home empty-handed.

CNN told the story of a man named Victory, who left Nigeria for Libya, intending to travel to Europe for a better life. Having been sold into slavery in Libya, he was released after his family paid ransom.

He was then held by Libyan authorities, prior to his relocation back to Nigeria. “I’m not happy,” he told CNN. “I go back and start back from square one. It’s very painful. Very painful.”

In a statement, the United Nations has called for “urgent action to end [Libya’s] trade in enslaved people.”

“It is now clear that slavery is an outrageous reality in Libya. The auctions are reminiscent of one of the darkest chapters in human history, when millions of Africans were uprooted, enslaved, trafficked and auctioned to the highest bidder.”

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